Music

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Year 7

In music lessons in year 7, you will learn basic skills that you need as a musician – that will serve you throughout Key Stage 3 and beyond. Our lessons will be ‘hands-on’ and practical – discovering the basics of reading and writing musical notation, as well as the correct technique on keyboard instruments. We also look at vocal studies (particularly focusing on music of the present day), as well as taster sessions on other instruments – notably djembes, guitars, ukuleles and more. We learn about the importance of chords, as well as learning to read basic notation on a 5 line stave (as well as tab).

 

Module/Project title

Key assessment piece

Autumn 1

Introduction to Music – basic theory/technique. Learning the notes of the treble clef/introduction to keyboard studies.

N/A

Autumn 2

“Raise Your Voice” – Vocal Studies (part singing).

Christmas Performance (in parts)

Spring 1

Key Skills 1 – chords (ukuleles/pianos/guitars)

n/a

Spring 2

Key Skills 2 – a closer look at notation

“The Sight Reading Challenge”

 Summer 1

Scales & Chords – the Circle of Fifths

Summer 2

Classroom Ensemble – putting it all together!

Classroom Ensemble performance.

Year 8

In music lessons in year 8, you will continue to build on the skills that you learnt in year 7. Throughout the first term, there will be a particular focus on musicality – looking at the theory behind what we have learnt so far, in a practical and engaging way. All students complete separate composition and performance tasks, as well as listening work based on the GCSE syllabus. We also study particular genres (such as a passing glance at ‘The Blues’, when we look at improvisation) and look at their stylistic characteristics – as well as learning to play in that style. We also look at music right up to the present day.

All levels of skill are welcomed in the music department. If you’d like to be involved further, all students are welcome to be involved in the extra-curricular life of the music department at Ysgol Penglais School. There are plenty of opportunities to get ‘stuck in’ – with choir, percussion ensemble, wind band, string orchestra, brass band, folk group, various bands, the A Capella group and plenty more. If you can’t see what you want, talk to Mr Budd – we will try to set it up for you!

Instrumental lessons are also available, with visiting peripatetic instrumental teachers provided by Ceredigion Music Service.  An instrument hire scheme is also available – further details can be found on the Ceredigion Music Service website.

 

Module/Project title

Key assessment piece

 Autumn 1

Ensemble Skills / The ‘Sight-reading Challenge’ (2)

N/A

Autumn 2

Developing Your Musicality – developing improvisation/vamping skills on keyboard/guitar/ukulele.

Christmas Performance (ensembles)

Spring 1

Forms & Devices 1 (developing key skills for GCSE).

n/a

Spring 2

Key Skills 3 – Using Music Technology as a tool for composition (Sibelius/Garageband/Dorico)

“The Sight Reading Challenge”

 Summer 1

A closer look at song-writing – how to write and craft a song.

n/a

Summer 2

Classroom Ensemble – putting it all together! (‘Musical Futures 1’ – guitars, bass, keys, drums, vocals and ukulele).

Classroom Ensemble performance.

Year 9

In music lessons in year 9, you will consolidate the knowledge and skills that you have learnt so far. In a ‘back to basics’ approach, we remind ourselves of the importance of chords – looking at, and playing, various examples of songs. We also learn the skills to play in a band (based on the ‘Musical Futures’ project), where students will get a chance to sample playing drums, keyboard, guitar or bass guitar – as well as (optionally) vocals. We also focus on song-writing, by looking at and emulating some of the tricks used by professional song-writers.

At the end of year 9, we aim for you to have all the skills that you need to begin studying on the GCSE music course, if you wish to.

All levels of skill are welcomed in the music department. If you’d like to be involved further, anyone is welcome to be involved in the extra-curricular life of the music department at Ysgol Penglais School. There are plenty of opportunities to get ‘stuck in’ – with choir, percussion ensemble, wind band, the A Capella group and plenty more. If you can’t see what you want, talk to Mr Budd – we will try to set it up for you!

Instrumental lessons are also available, with visiting peripatetic instrumental teachers provided by Ceredigion Music Service. An instrument hire scheme is also available – further details can be found on the Ceredigion Music Service website.

 

Module/Project title

Key assessment piece

 Autumn 1

Musical Futures 1 – Ensemble skills (guitars/keys/bass/drums/vocals etc).

N/A

Autumn 2

Musical Futures 2 (guitars/keys/bass/drums/vocals)

“Battle of the Bands” performance

Spring 1

Key Skills 3 – preparing for GCSE Music. (Performance-and composition based – lots of opportunities to specialise).

n/a

Spring 2

“The Final Countdown” – our last half term together as a Year 9 music class. If you aren’t joining us for GCSE Music in 2020/2021, this is the last lap – where we use all of our skills, and enjoy making music together!
If you enjoy it, it’s not too late to change…

Band Performances/recordings etc.

 Summer 1

n/a (GCSE courses have started).

Summer 2

n/a (GCSE courses have started).

 

Year 10

At Ysgol Penglais School, we follow the WJEC curriculum for GCSE Music; this follows a course of performance, composition and appraisal. The course is designed to be taught to pupils who have no previous experience as a musician, but who are both enthusiastic and willing to learn; the course is inclusive, and we welcome anyone. However, the course is both practical and academically rigorous in it’s content; it has the potential to lead on to A Level music, which is a recognised subject for prestigious universities to look out for during UCAS applications.

In addition (and as part of the GCSE music course at Ysgol Penglais School), each GCSE music candidate is entitled to free instrumental or vocal lessons for the duration of the two years of the course. It is possible to continue this into KS5 (if studying A Level music), thereby potentially allowing four years of free instrumental or vocal lessons whilst at Ysgol Penglais School.

GCSE music students also enjoy plenty of opportunities to get involved in the music department, if they wish to. Regular ‘Talking Shop’ online Q&A sessions are run with professional musicians, whilst there are also regular online concerts. There are also opportunities to get involved with music technology and live sound too. We would be thrilled to welcome you to the music department to study GCSE music, regardless of previous musical experience. If you would like to know more, do get in contact (p.budd@penglais.org.uk).

At Ysgol Penglais School, we follow the WJEC specification for GCSE music. Remember that no prior experience is needed: all are welcome on the GCSE music course. We will teach you all that you need to know! All that we ask is for an enthusiasm for the subject, and a willingness to learn.

The course is divided into three main aspects: performing, composing and appraising.

Alongside the course requirements below, don’t forget that you will need to be in a routine of practicing your instrument regularly – as well as attending your instrumental lessons. Students who opt to take GCSE music at Ysgol Penglais School are eligible for free instrumental or singing lessons, via a peripatetic teacher through Ceredigion Music Service.

Performing: You will be recorded performing a minimum of two pieces – one of which must be in an ensemble (eg a rock band or a string quartet).

This part of the course is worth 30%. In addition, you’ll also need write a short programme note about one of the pieces. This is worth an additional 5%.

Composing: During the course, you will compose a minimum of two pieces – which will be internally assessed and moderated. One of these will be a ‘free choice’ (where you can choose your brief and instrumentation), whilst the other will be to a brief set by the exam board.

This part of the course is worth 30%. In addition, you also need to write an evaluation of one of your compositions. This is worth an additional 5%.

Appraising: At the end of the course, you will sit a listening exam. In essence, you will listen to music – then answer questions on it.

There are eight questions in total – based on four areas of study.

 

Area of study 1: Musical Forms and Devices

Area of study 2: Music for Ensemble

Area of study 3: Film Music

Area of study 4: Popular Music

 

During the two years of the course, we look at past papers and ‘exam-style’ questions – to make sure that you are prepared for the exam.

The written exam is worth 30% of the overall course.

Module/Project title

Key assessment piece

 Autumn 1

Forms & Devices

 

Introduction to area of study 1: Forms and Devices with terminology as appropriate:

o binary, ternary and rondo forms

o repetition, contrast, sequence, ostinato, dotted rhythms, conjunct and disjunct movement, broken chord/arpeggio, melodic and rhythmic motifs, simple chord progressions

• Performing – establishing standards and setting targets: first practical assessment

• Notating a simple melody

• Using ICT in the music department

• Appreciating and using the elements/‘building blocks’

• Recapping the basics – aural, notational and listening skills

• Introduction to prepared extract – Rondeau.

 

 

 

 

• Performing in front of others

• Composing e.g. writing a melody in a simple structure using devices

• Class performance of Rondeau drawing out relevant teaching points

• Listening exercises to develop notation skills

• Listening exercises to develop the ability to identify musical elements AO3 and appraising skills AO4

Autumn 2

Introduction to area of study 4: Popular Music, with terminology:

o rock and pop

• Appraising; more challenging theoretical and aural work:

o strophic form, verse, chorus, middle 8, riffs, bridge, fill, break, intros and outros

o primary and secondary chords, cadences, standard chord progressions, power chords, rhythmic devices such as syncopation, driving rhythms

o the relationship between melody and chords

• How to ‘describe’ a piece using the elements of musical language

• Introduction to prepared extract – Handbags and Gladrags:

o Instrumentation/orchestration (including piano, oboe, strings and brass) lead vocals, strophic form, repetitive chord sequences, cadences (chordal analysis), solo, rhythmic features (syncopation,), walking/descending bass

 

 

 

 

Class performance of Handbags and Gladrags

• Incorporating synthesized sounds with vocal work and accompaniment

• Composing with chords (and melody)

• Start a composing ‘sketch book’

• Improvisation tasks

• Listening exercises to develop notation skills

• Listening exercises to develop the ability to identify musical elements AO3 and appraising skills AO4

Spring 1

 

Introduction to area of study 2: Music for Ensemble

• Performing in smaller ensembles; (e.g. chamber music, jazz, musical theatre etc) as suited to learner interests (cover other topics in year 11).

• Composing using texture and sonority (chords and melody) including:

o Monophonic, homophonic, unison, chordal, melody and accompaniment

• Evaluating their own music

• Introducing the more challenging concepts of melody, harmony and tonality:

o inversions, dissonance, range, intervals, pentatonic, blue notes, modulations to relative major/minor

 

Compose a short piece (homophonic texture)

• Evaluate composition

• Perform a piece in one of the styles associated with the area of study as a member of an ensemble

• Listening exercises to develop notation skills

• Listening exercises to develop the ability to identify musical

 

 

 

Spring 2

Introduction to area of study 3: Film Music, with devices and terminology:

o Layering, imitation chromatic movement and dissonance in harmonic work, leitmotifs, thematic transformation

• The relationship between the story and the music

• The effect of audience, time and place

• Use of sonority to create a mood

• Use of dynamics to create a mood

• Evaluating their own work

• Writing a programme note

 

 

Solo performing with programme note

• Composing to a brief (a piece of film music)

• Producing a score and evaluation

• Listening exercises to develop notation skills

• Listening exercises to develop the ability to identify musical elements AO3 and appraising skills AO4

 Summer 1 + 2

 

Revisiting topics from year 10 using different pieces as examples

• Complete composition project (of choice) and submit

• Continue to build aural skills

 

Free composition

• Work on year 10 performance pieces

• Listening exercises to develop notation skills

• Listening exercises to develop the ability to identify musical elements AO3 and appraising skills AO4

 

Performance

• Assessment of composition to WJEC criteria

• Mock listening exam based on areas of study

• Mock performing assessment – two pieces ( with at least one ensemble)

Year 11

At Ysgol Penglais School, we follow the WJEC curriculum for GCSE Music; this follows a course of performance, composition and appraisal. The course is designed to be taught to pupils who have no previous experience as a musician, but who are both enthusiastic and willing to learn; the course is inclusive, and we welcome anyone. However, the course is both practical and academically rigorous in it’s content; it has the potential to lead on to A Level music, which is a recognised subject for prestigious universities to look out for during UCAS applications.

In addition (and as part of the GCSE music course at Ysgol Penglais School), each GCSE music candidate is entitled to free instrumental or vocal lessons for the duration of the two years of the course. It is possible to continue this into KS5 (if studying A Level music), thereby potentially allowing four years of free instrumental or vocal lessons whilst at Ysgol Penglais School.

GCSE music students also enjoy plenty of opportunities to get involved in the music department, if they wish to. Regular ‘Talking Shop’ online Q&A sessions are run with professional musicians, whilst there are also regular online concerts. There are also opportunities to get involved with music technology and live sound too. We would be thrilled to welcome you to the music department to study GCSE music, regardless of previous musical experience. If you would like to know more, do get in contact (p.budd@penglais.org.uk).

Alongside the course requirements below, don’t forget that you will need to be in a routine of practicing your instrument regularly – as well as attending your instrumental lessons. Students who opt to take GCSE music at Ysgol Penglais School are eligible for free instrumental lessons, via a peripatetic teacher through Ceredigion Music Service too!

Performing: You will be recorded performing a minimum of two pieces  – one of which must be in an ensemble (eg a rock band or a string quartet).

This part of the course is worth 30%. In addition, you’ll also need write a short program note about one of the pieces. This is worth an additional 5%.

Composing: During the course, you will compose a minimum of two pieces – which will be internally assessed and moderated. One of these will be a ‘free choice’ (where you can choose your brief and instrumentation), whilst the other will be to a brief set by the exam board.

This part of the course is worth 30%. In addition, you also need to write an evaluation of one of your compositions. This is worth an additional 5%.

Appraising: At the end of the course, you will sit a listening exam. In essence, you will listen to music – then answer questions on it!

There are eight questions in total – based on four areas of study.

 

Area of study 1: Musical Forms and Devices

Area of study 2: Music for Ensemble

Area of study 3: Film Music

Area of study 4: Popular Music

 

During the two years of the course, we look at past papers and ‘exam-style’ questions – to make sure that you are prepared for the exam.

The written exam is worth 30% of the overall course.